Ontario Provincial Election

The most recent provincial election in Ontario took place on Thursday, June 2, 2022.

The Progressive Conservatives won a second majority government. FOCA would like to congratulate all of the successful candidates, and would also like to make note of the continuing and new ministers in some key portfolios for our organization:
  • Graydon Smith, the former mayor of Bracebridge, becomes Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry
  • David Piccini stays as Environment Minister
  • Greg Rickford is the Minister of Northern Development and the Minister of Indigenous Affairs
  • Todd Smith stays as Minister of Energy
  • Steve Clark stays as Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing
  • Peter Bethlenfalvy stays as Minister of Finance.
You can see the full list of Members of Provincial Parliament (MPPs), and their portfolios, here: https://www.ola.org/en/members/current
See the election results in an interactive map from CBC:

https://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/elections/ontario/2022/results/

The term of office for elected provincial representatives is a four year term.

Earlier News:

1. Determine if you are eligible to vote, and ensure you are on the voting list:

Voting in Ontario: Official links from Elections Ontario

You can find your electoral district by postal code, here

image: asterix buttonQUESTION: I own two properties in Ontario. Can I vote in my waterfront community in the provincial election? response from Elections Ontario: “A voter can only vote in the electoral district that they consider home. Some voters may get more than one Voter Information Card, however by law a voter can only vote once {in a provincial election}.” 

Voter Information Cards are mailed to registered voters, letting them know exactly when and where to vote on the provincial election day. Elections Ontario reminds you to make sure you receive a Voter Information Card, by registering online now.

For this, and more Q&A, visit:   https://www.elections.on.ca/content/ngw/en/voting-in-ontario/frequently-asked-questions.html

2. Learn which candidate in your community best represents your position on the issues that mean the most to you and your family! Here are some example questions to ask your provincial candidates:

Will your party: create healthy sustainable communities and respect the authority of local jurisdictions to manage local planning?

Will your party: stop freezing communities out of planning decisions by restoring reasonable supports for engagement in Local Planning Appeals Tribunal (LPAT) appeals, and end use of Minister’s Zoning Orders (MZO) for anything other than areas lacking planning controls or issues of true provincial interest?

Will your party: keep our taps flowing fresh by protecting water sources and water quality?

Will your party: affirm and support the role of Conservation Authorities in protecting watersheds and natural systems?

Will your party: embrace forward-looking planning processes like regional, strategic, and comprehensive environmental assessments, and restore the requirement for assessments for public sector projects while extending coverage to environmentally impactful private sector projects, including forestry, mining and smelters?

Review party platforms here:

More tools:

Vote Compass: compare your views to party platforms for the 2022 Ontario election (CBC)

Get tips on raising your political voice, and getting your issues on your candidates’ radar, from our webpage: https://foca.on.ca/raise-your-political-voice-tips-from-foca/

Related News:

May 16, 2022 – Ontario Election 2022 platforms: Here’s what the PCs, Liberals, NDP and Greens are promising (National Post) – “The promises are drawn from the party’s own platforms or in the case of the governing Progressive Conservatives, the budget they presented to the legislature before the election began.”

May 14, 2022 – Here’s a breakdown of the major party platforms in Ontario’s election campaign (CBC News – Thunder Bay)

May 12, 2022 – Here are the various ways to vote in the Ontario election – including advance voting and voting by mail where the deadline to apply is 6 p.m. on May 27 (CTV News)

Ontario Election 2022 (Globe and Mail)

May 4, 2022 – Ontario election 2022: Here’s what the PCs, NDP, Liberals and Greens have promised so far (Global News)

News from the last provincial election (2018):

Provincial Election 2018: Results and map

June 7, 2018 – Election Day in Ontario: Here’s what you need to know (CBC)

June 6, 2018 – Ontario election 2018 cheat sheet: A last minute voter’s guide (Global News)

June 6, 2018 – For the first time, Millennials will be the largest cohort of Ontario voters. Will they decide the election? (Toronto Star)

June 6, 2018 – 2018 Ontario election newspaper endorsements: Doug Ford or Andrea Horwath? (Maclean’s)

June 4, 2018 – A voter’s guide to the 2018 Ontario election (Torornto Star)

June 4, 2018 – What Ontario voters should ask themselves in the last days of the election campaign (TVO)

June 4, 2018 – Political parties respond to questions about their policies regarding water and infrastructure, from the Ontario Municipal Water Association (OMWA)

June 4, 2018 – Municipal issues for the 2018 Ontario Provincial Election (= services, property taxes) (pdf, AMO)

June 3, 2018 – Ontario election: What’s a voter to do? (Globe and Mail)

May 31, 2018  – Ontario election 2018 platform guide: Where the parties stand on everything from hydro bills to taxes to transit  – Your complete guide to the issues at stake in Ontario’s 2018 provincial election. (Updated regularly , by Maclean’s)

May 31, 2018 – Environment, energy and climate change define divisions among Ontario’s political parties. (Mark Winfield; Linked In)

May 29, 2018 – How big is Ontario’s hydro problem? And can the Liberals, NDP or PCs fix it? (Global News) Also see video: Ontario’s energy situation is one of the most talked about election issues. It isn’t going to be an easy one to clean up.

May 24, 2018 – Ontario’s political climate: How the four parties stack up on the environment
ANALYSIS: Climate change hasn’t been a dominant issue this election season — but the province’s future depends on what our politicians choose to do about it (TVO)

May 22, 2018 – 2018 Party Responses 2018 to Ontario’s environmental challenges (Green Prosperity)

May 20, 2018 – Want to vote ‘none of the above’ in Ontario’s election? Here’s how you can (Globe and Mail)  All of us have a right and a duty to have our say on election day. Vote for one of the parties, if you can. Decline your ballot, if you must. But be heard.

May 16, 2018 – How to cast your ballot: The non-partisan’s voting guide  (The Conversation)

May 14, 2018 – How Ontarians are being targeted on Facebook with the provincial election under way (Globe and Mail)

May 13, 2018 – Voter beware: Political ads don’t have to be true: Professor
We grew to 100,000 Facebook fans without spending a cent on advertising. We have 100,000 e-mail subscribers. We don’t have to spend money and we can still reach millions of people every week.

May 12, 2018 – An all-candidates’ debates survival guide (National Newswatch)

May 7, 2018 – Ontario election leaders debate: The opening and closing statements from Wynne, Ford and Horwath – transcript (Maclean’s)

May 4, 2018 – Young people are paying attention to Ontario’s election (Toronto Star)

“Young people are twice as likely to believe that they can’t vote… In fact, any citizen can show up on voting day with valid identification to prove their eligibility on the spot.

“Millennials are far more likely (51 per cent) to say they lack enough information “to make an informed decision” at election time — compared to roughly one in three older adults (and only one in four seniors)… and are more than twice as likely as other adults to say they want access to more political reporting.”

In this election season young people may be more motivated, but they also know what they don’t know — and that they need to know more.

April 26, 2018 – An unimpeachable source lobs an unavoidable bomb into Ontario’s election Ontario’s auditor general says the Liberals’ deficit estimates are very wrong—which will affect every party running in the coming election (Maclean’s)

April 25, 2018 – Auditor general’s report could spell trouble for all three of Ontario’s political parties  (Toronto Star)

March 10, 2018 – Doug Ford Named New Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader (Macleans)

March 7, 2018 – Government is always unfair to someone – it has to be (Northern Ontario Business)

March 6, 2018 –  Let 16-year-olds vote? Not a bad idea  (Toronto Star)

March 5, 2018 – Ontario election agenda: What you need to know for March 5 (TVO)

February 28, 2018 – Provincial leaders gather to discuss — not debate — democracy  (Toronto Star)

February 1, 2018 – Ontario PC leadership race is on: here’s how it shapes up. The battle to replace Patrick Brown will be short (CBC)

January 31, 2018 –  Ontario PCs to endorse open leadership campaign Wednesday: Insiders (Toronto Sun)

January 17, 2018 – Kathleen Wynne shuffles cabinet to replace veterans before election; Shuffle is prompted by 3 of Wynne’s cabinet ministers announcing they won’t seek re-election in June (CBC)

December 19, 2017 – Kathleen Wynne pitches Liberals as ‘change’ after 14 years in power (CBC)

December 18, 2017 – Patrick Brown’s all about family, politics and hockey (Toronto Sun)

December 14, 2017 – Horwath takes aim at Wynne and Brown ahead of June vote (Toronto Star)

November 26, 2017 – You can argue it’s ‘Liberal lite,’ but Ontario PC platform offers a pathway to victory (National Post)  See the PC 2018 party platform “People’s Guarantee

November 15, 2017 – The Ontario Liberals’ Fall Economic Statement 2017

Fall 2017 – Ontario NDP vision document It’s about change. It’s about you.

June 13, 2017 – Is the third time the charm for Green Party Leader Mike Schreiner? (TVO)


September 2017 – Elections Ontario has launched an e-registration portal. Click here to view.

June 7, 2017 – How Ontario’s 2018 election campaign will be different from 2014 (CBC)


Bill 115, Electoral Boundaries Act, 2015, received Royal Assent on December 3, 2015. Bill 115 increases the number of electoral districts from 107 to 122, following along the boundaries set out by the federal 2013 Representation Order for Ontario, while preserving the special boundaries of the 11 seats in Northern Ontario set out in the 1996 redistribution. Two new districts have been created in Ontario’s Far North.

Bill 45, the Election Statute Law Amendment Act, 2016, received royal assent on December 8, 2016. This Bill fixes  the election date to the first Thursday in June of the fourth calendar year.

Terry ReesOntario Provincial Election