OPP Policing Costs – OVERVIEW

April 25, 2018 – Will trading local police for OPP save money? (CTV News Northern Ontario)

February 12, 2018 – AMO submission on Policing Bill 175
“...Ontarians pay the highest policing costs in the country. Much of what has driven the cost of policing in Ontario is the legislation that governs policing. Improvements to the efficiency and effectiveness of policing has been a key goal of municipal elected officials for many years. Some changes in Bill 175 will advance the agenda to modernize policing, particularly with respect to oversight. But there are some elements of the Bill which will drive municipal costs and police budgets even higher...”

November 2, 2017: Proposed Bill fails to deliver more effective, affordable modern police services (AMO)

February 12, 2018 – AMO makes submission on Policing Bill 175
http://www.selwyntownship.ca/en/townshiphall/resources/2018/Council-Agenda-February-27-2018/6.-a-2.-AMO-Alert—Police-Act-Changes.pdf

Much of what has driven the cost of policing in Ontario is the legislation that governs policing. As a
result, legislation that enables improvements to the efficiency and effectiveness of policing has been
a key goal of municipal elected officials for many years. There are some changes in Bill 175 will
advance the agenda to modernize policing, particularly with respect to oversight. But there are
equally some elements of the Bill which will drive municipal costs and police budgets even higher

August 15, 2014: Billing model announced! Click here to read the latest, and FOCA’s comments…

Update July 23, 2014: Time is running out to speak up about unfair billing practices for OPP police services

2014: New OPP billing model being revisited

Property owners need to stay vigilant, and SPEAK OUT!

Since early 2014*, FOCA has been speaking out against the proposed changes to the OPP Billing model, which could significantly alter the amount that rural municipalities will pay for policing services – and residential property taxes.

* See FOCA’s calls-to-action in the FOCA Elerts of January 2014 (PDF) and February 2014 (PDF) 

April 2014: Following on the calls for a renewed approach to OPP funding from FOCA, many individuals, lake associations, and their municipal representatives, the Province has agreed to hold fast (for now) and to take another look at the model.

Write your MPP!

FOCA urges members to write their MPP with concerns about the proposed OPP billing model.

A sample letter for FOCA members

Policing represents a significant portion of public service costs that are paid for through property taxes. The costs of municipal policing in Ontario (2011) were $3.76 billion, of which $353 million was OPP contracted services. 324 Ontario municipalities (including most cottage country municipalities) use OPP contract services.

The OPP has been proposing reforms to the billing system which will have significant implications for all OPP policed municipalities, where there are currently a wide range of per household costs (from under $100 to over $600).

The new costs assessed to municipalities were proposed to be on a per (residential ONLY) property basis, which are then paid for by residential taxpayers based on the assessed value of properties. Higher valued properties (read “waterfront”) will pick up a larger portion of any changed costs of policing.

In addition to a new billing protocol, overall policing costs are on the rise, driven by a new collective agreement (including an 8.5% salary increase this year) PLUS a $75 million planned reduction in Provincial contributions to policing costs through the Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund (OMPF) over the next three years.

FOCA believes that municipal governments, and the taxpayers that fund them, cannot afford the consequences of a hasty change in policy.

To that end FOCA wrote a letter  to the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services requesting a more thorough review and consideration of changes to this major budget line in municipal budgets, and the residential property tax bill.

FOCA encourages every concerned member to contact your municipality to learn more about the potential impacts on your local budget, and to get involved in making your concerns known. You can see our summary of the issues in our  letter to members from February 2014.

Michelle LewinOPP Policing Costs – OVERVIEW